The Engineer's Blog

Energy efficient, personalized, smart - in need of extensive maintenance? Engineers in machine design are faced with increased demands. How do they meet them? What kind of solutions evolve in different industries? How is it possible to enforce innovation internally? Have a read on this and more in our blog.

 

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API – More than a Standard

By WP on Sep 13, 2017

In this blog article we are going to take a closer look at the API Standard 671 which specifies the requirements for special purpose couplings used in the petroleum, petrochemical and natural gas industries. This Standard has been developed by the American Petroleum Institute (API), which is not to be confused with the identical abbreviation used in the IT field (Application Programming Interface). Let's begin with a few details about the institute that gave the name to the API Standard. 

Topics: Energy
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Trade Fair Review: Power-Gen Europe 2017, Cologne

By WP on Jul 05, 2017

Since 1993 the annual exhibition and conference for the European energy industry presents new developments on the topics such as renewable energies, power plant technology as well as distributed energy generation. Since then the Power-Gen is deemed to be the leading trade fair for the power technology and energy industry in Europe, which takes place at changing locations every year. For the 25th issue of this trade visitor fair with its accompanying internationally oriented congress, organisers PennWell (UK) selected Cologne (Germany).

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Couplings in Aeroderivative Gas Turbines

By Thomas Marterer on Jun 07, 2017

Gas turbines are available in many different designs and the power output of the individual models varies considerably – from 200 kW to more than 400 MW. The performance of gas turbines for industrial applications typically ranges from 5 to 40 MW. Dependent on the power, the speeds vary from 3,000 rpm to 15,000 rpm. Please see below which couplings are typically used and which are the selection criteria.

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Couplings for the safe operation of piston engine-powered CHPs: not too soft, not too stiff

By Sophie Keil on Oct 12, 2016

The demands made on the components in combined heat and power plants (CHP) are increasing. They have to be efficient, long-lasting and, in case of an emergency, must at least fulfill the safety requirements set forth by the Medium Voltage Guideline. Thomas Marterer, Product Manager at RINGFEDER POWER TRANSMISSION, explains how operators of CHPs can find the correct coupling for their plant: The coupling should withstand high temperatures and be neither torsionally too stiff nor too soft.

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Certification According to the Medium Voltage Guidelines: the Following Applies to CHPs

By Thomas Marterer on Sep 21, 2016

Pursuant to the supplement to the Medium Voltage Guideline in 2013, the certification directives for co-generation plants have been adopted and the obligation to furnish evidence of compliance with the BDEW guidelines of 2009 is now also binding for co-generation plants. As a result, certificates have to be furnished for CHPs connected to the medium voltage grid with reference to their behavior in the event of a failure.

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Combined Heat and Power Units Assist in Securing Grid Stability, which particularly Challenges their Gensets

By Thomas Marterer on Sep 14, 2016

The amendment to the obligatory certification within the medium voltage guideline in 2013 catapulted combined heat and power units into a new league: they are now also in charge of stabilizing the dynamic German power supply network. This provides excellent opportunities for the technology, but it also means new obligations.  

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Reciprocating Engines in Combined Heat and Power Units: Is Higher Power without Loss of Energy Efficiency Possible?

By Thomas Marterer on Aug 03, 2016

The combined heat and power technology (CHP), in particular co-generation units, have long been a part of the industrial energy transition. However, the large potential of combined heat and power units is still underutilized. The reason for this, among others, is because of the properties of the installed drive technology: for instance, the non-uniform torque of reciprocating engines. New components promise more power with consistently good energy efficiency.

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